News

Renée Green at MoCA Cleveland and FRONT Triennial

Visual representation of the news item Renée Green at MoCA Cleveland and FRONT Triennial link

For FRONT 2022, Cleveland-born artist Renée Green has conceived Contact, her first major exhibition in the city, which occupies all of moCa Cleveland’s public spaces and radiates out into the city with workshops and film screenings.

A contrapuntal exhibition, Contact weaves together Green’s own works–some newly commissioned by FRONT 2022­–with a vast array of invited participants with whom she’s been in conversation through the years.

Marina Rheingantz: FRAC Auvergne Catalogue

Visual representation of the news item Marina Rheingantz: FRAC Auvergne Catalogue link

Marina Rheingantz’s paintings and embroidery are nourished by the recollection of Brazilian landscapes, memories of the compactness of the earth, of light and its variations, of the atmospheric nebula of twilight, of the pointillist dissemination of birds in the sky, of the emergence in clusters of flowers and shrubs, of mounds emerged on the surface of the flooded plains… Painting landscapes, today, cannot be envisaged without the awareness of the incongruity and the inactuality of such subject. Painting landscapes cannot depart from the conviction that such a subject – historically exhausted – can still be tackled, especially if one keeps in mind a banality that it is always good to remember, namely that a painting is first of all the story of a look at something: the painting tells how the painter’s gaze landed on his subject before placing it on its support. What we see of Marina Rheingantz’s landscapes are not the landscapes themselves but a singular look at these expanses, the way she sees them with memory, in the leafing of plans and patterns, the aerial dives of expanses without horizon strewn with suspended patterns, agglomerates of light, dust, phosphenes, clouds of microscopic ephemera, spangled with particles of reality frozen in appearance and yet always moving. The gaze is brought to a halt, stopped in its surveying by the resistance of the paint, by the compactness of its surface, by the web of patterns and signs that dot the areas and are superimposed on them like openwork filters.

Texts by Douglas Fogle and Jean-Charles Vergne
French / English, format 30 x 24 cm, 216 pages

Publisher: FRAC Auvergne

Artist & Author Talk — Barbara Kasten: Architecture & Film (2015–2020)

Visual representation of the news item Artist & Author Talk — Barbara Kasten: Architecture & Film (2015–2020) link

Join artist Barbara Kasten, editor Stephanie Cristello (Curator), and author Humberto Moro (Dia Art Foundation) in advance of the book Barbara Kasten: Architecture & Film (2015–2020) publishing in Fall of 2022 with Skira. Assembling a group of leading writers—including Irena Haiduk, Hans Ulrich Obrist, and Mimi Zeiger—the publication features newly commissioned texts that further the discourse into Kasten’s varied practice with a focus on work from the last five years alongside previously unpublished projects from the 1960s to the present.

The online space of this event, designed by Tal Erez and Dan Handel, will explore virtual interiors as well as interim videos inspired by Barbara Kasten’s visual worlds. Presented in partnership with the Terra Foundation for American Art’s program, Art Design Chicago Now, and Skira Editore.

Thu, May 26, 2022

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT


Daniel Buren at MoMA

Visual representation of the news item Daniel Buren at MoMA link

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, has opened a room on its fourth floor featuring 12 striped cotton fabric works by Daniel Buren

In 1965, Buren visited the Marché Saint-Pierre, a textile market in Paris, and purchased rolls of striped canvas reminiscent of awnings you might see outside a café. Taken by the stripes’ minimalism and neutrality, Buren began to use this canvas for his works, painting over the colored stripes at or near the left and right borders of the canvas in white acrylic. He felt that the simplicity of the stripes allows his works to relate to their physical surroundings—and in so doing, they call attention to the social and political dimensions of the contexts in which they’re displayed.

The works will remain on view at MoMA until autumn 2022.

Nicolás Gaugnini at MACRO – Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome

Visual representation of the news item Nicolás Gaugnini at MACRO – Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome link

A series of key works alternate over the course of the two acts, outlining recurring themes in the artist’s oeuvre—“from the unconscious to the market”, as he writes—while revealing the variety of media with which Guagnini experiments and expresses himself: video-performance (Discharge, 2005; Tango 78, 2010; Clear Allegiance, 2012; Analysis, 2019) and slide-projection-installation (The Middle Class Goes to Heaven, 2005–2006), printing (the wallpaper Notes on Dickface, 2014), painting (77 Testicular Imprints, 2007), sculpture (the vitrified and glazed ceramics of Lumpen, Points of View and Raft, 2014; Aphasia Bagatelle, Decurion, and Divinity School—The Ice Queen, 2016). Throughout the exhibition, the floor of the room will be almost entirely covered by an installation of sheets of paper, printed with a conversation between the artist and Luca Lo Pinto: the scenario of this comedy, made available to its audience, at their feet.

Polly Apfelbaum and Madeline Hollander at the Dries Van Noten Little House

Visual representation of the news item Polly Apfelbaum and Madeline Hollander at the Dries Van Noten Little House link

The Dries Van Noten Little House welcomes its first two-person exhibition, Some People See Time by artists Polly Apfelbaum and Madeline Hollander. In the exhibition, open through September 11, 2021, the artists work in a dialogue one color, movement, texture, and tempo with Hollander’s choreographic drawings, made into a calendar of sorts, and Apfelbaum’s “fallen paintings” of fabric strewn about the floor, shifting every week of the exhibition.

In the exhibition text from Stephen Westfall, he writes, “The synesthete toggles across the border between anguish and reverie. Kandinsky would have to commit himself to bed for days at a time when overcome by synesthesia-induced headaches, but he also envisioned abstract painting when immersed in a yellow cloud during a performance of his friend, Schoenberg’s music. The otherwise uncommunicative, seemingly catatonic subjects of Oliver Sacks’ essay ‘The Twins’ would call out impossibly large prime numbers to each other and rock back and forth in subdued ecstasy, a story which brings me to numbers as vessels of color and flavor. Madeline Hollander and I disagree vehemently over the taste and color of the numeral ‘5,’ for instance, but we both see its aura and taste it.”

Tom Burr at RISD Museum

Visual representation of the news item Tom Burr at RISD Museum link

Any distance between us explores the power and significance of intimate relationships in works of contemporary art. Almost all of the thirty-five participating artists identify as queer and/or people of color. The exhibition’s forty artworks, made from 1954 to 2021, are drawn from active artists' studios, private collections, and from the RISD Museum’s permanent collection. Together, they reflect a profound cultural and political shift over the last seventy-five years in representations of sexual orientation, gender identification, class, and race. Any distance between us draws poetic connections between works from disparate media (including paintings, drawings, photographs, sculpture, and prints), distinct historical moments, and different cultural contexts.

Tom Burr at White Columns

Visual representation of the news item Tom Burr at White Columns link

White Columns is happy to announce ‘From The Archives: White Columns & 112 Greene Street / 112 Workshop, 1970 – 2021…’ an exhibition that considers the ongoing legacy of New York’s oldest non-profit, alternative art space. Drawn exclusively from the organization‘s archives the exhibition charts the history of White Columns over the past five decades: from its beginnings at 112 Greene Street in SoHo to its current home in the Meatpacking District. White Columns was founded by a group of artists in October 1970 and was originally known as 112 Greene Street / 112 Workshop. The organization was renamed White Columns in 1980 following its move to 325 Spring Street.

The exhibition is structured around a display of archival materials – inc. press releases, posters, flyers, correspondence, mission statements, exhibition schedules, installation images, etc. – that runs through the gallery in the form of a timeline. Three large vitrines contain a selection of printed exhibition announcements from the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. (The gallery largely stopped producing printed invitations c. 2008.) A further series of smaller vitrines focus on some twenty key projects from the organization’s fifty-year history – including those dedicated to exhibitions by Gordon Matta-Clark (1972), Louise Bourgeois (1974), Lee Quiñones and Fred Bathwaite (1980), Group Material (1987), Cady Noland (1988), and Fred Wilson (1990) among others.

Over the past fifty years – literally – thousands of artists have contributed to and helped to shape 112 Greene Street’s and White Columns’ programs. The exhibition, given the constraints of space, can only be a partial account of all this extraordinary activity. The gallery’s full archives can now be accessed online via our website at www.whitecolumns.org/archive/ (http://www.whitecolumns.org/archive/) – a resource that is constantly being updated and augmented as new archival materials come to light.

Renée Green in the Borås Art Biennial

Visual representation of the news item Renée Green in the Borås Art Biennial link

Via films, essays and writings, installations, digital media, architecture, sound-related works, film series and events, her work engages with explorations into cir­cuits of relation and exchange over time, the gaps and shifts in what survives in public and private memories, as well as what has been imagined and invented.

At Borås Art Museum, Green presents Space Poem #7 (Color Without Objects: Intra-Active May-Words) (2020), which is composed of twenty-eight double sided banners hanging from the gallery ceiling. Invoking the words of American Swedish poet May Swenson, the work invites viewers into a textual and spatial dialogue with words, color, and form. Space Poem #7 continues Green’s ongoing investigation into transmutation and meaning and its formal and poetical modes of communication.

Lesley Vance at Xavier Hufkens

Visual representation of the news item Lesley Vance at Xavier Hufkens link

Vance’s oeuvre has a temporal dimension, since the artist not only works within the pictorial space but also across time: she often elaborates her constellations of free-flowing lines and loops over the course of months. During this period, an initially active sequence of gestures develops into a matrix of interrelated shapes and, crucially, a vigorous interplay between light and shadow, foreground and background. Taking the conventional definition of ‘slipstream’ as ‘an assisting force that draws something along behind it’, Vance’s paintings can be said to follow in the slipstream of the streaks and striations left behind in the wake of her initial squeegeed gestures. This foundational and intuitive movement of paint produces marks of varying velocity that act as the catalyst for subsequent gestures and actions. Working without assistants, her compositions are intimately linked to the physical act of painting, and her large-format works bear witness to both the reach, and limits, of the human body. Added to this is the emphasis on colour that becomes – especially in the larger paintings – an almost kinetic force. Lesley Vance not only demonstrates an eye for evocative hues but also the way in which contrasting and complementary shades can evoke an atmosphere, idea or even an art historical reference. The artist’s considered use of bright contrasts, bold sweeping lines, simplified organic forms and areas of pure vibrant colour (red, blue, yellow, and green) lend her most recent works an intense visual dynamism.

Renée Green: Camino Road

Visual representation of the news item Renée Green: Camino Road link

First published in 1994, Camino Road is artist Renée Green’s debut novel—a short, ruminative work infused with semantic ambiguity and the dreamy poetry of the quotidian. Republished here in a facsimile edition, the book ostensibly traces its protagonist Lyn’s journeys to Mexico and her return to attend art school in 1980s New York, but what emerges is more an intertextual assemblage of the moments between drives, dreams, and consciousness. Lyn does her Spanish homework and makes note to read Anna Kavan and Cortázar; she watches Fellini; she dreams about the Mediterranean Sea. Much like Green’s multimedia installations encompassing the sonic, spatial, and visual, Camino Road is richly layered—part intellectual genealogy, part fictional personal memory, and part cultural criticism.

Green has described the book as a “self-conscious homage to or parody of the ‘road novel,’ ‘bohemia,’ and artist-rebels.” “I’d been thinking about the beat generation, figures like Jack Kerouac, Burroughs, etc.—the mythic construction of the artist personality as rebel and how females, and myself in particular, entered into that,” she said. “These ‘beat’ sources seemed to form a typical American introduction to the idea of bohemia and of being an artist.”

Originally created as part of Green’s contribution for the group exhibition “Cocido y crudo/The Cooked and the Raw” at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, the text is written in both English and Spanish, and accompanied by an appendix of photographs and ephemera tracing Madrid’s La Movida, a Spanish countercultural moment from the 1980s. The book was published through Green’s production company, Free Agent Media (FAM), which since 1994 has been circulating and exhibiting media, printed matter, and time-based projects.

A unique treatise on the circuits of exchange in gender, politics, and art, Camino Road can also be read as a variation on the classic Bildungsroman genre. “I don’t feel developed in any area,” thinks Lyn at one point. “It’s very difficult being young and incomplete.” Importantly, she also muses, “I want to be swallowed by another language.”

In Conversation: Piero Golia and Pier Paolo Pancotto

Visual representation of the news item In Conversation: Piero Golia and Pier Paolo Pancotto link

Piero Golia will speak with curator Pier Paolo Pancotto in conjunction with the publication of a new book about the artist’s recent work at La Fondazione, Rome. On January 18, 2020, a team of construction workers with jackhammers appeared at the institution and rather than conducting maintenance work, as might be expected, were directed by Golia to engrave the phrase “The End” into the floor as the third and final performance of his Roman Trilogy. Over the course of the work’s production, the unrelenting drilling disrupted the surrounding commercial gallery spaces—both literally and conceptually—causing the paintings hanging on the walls to shake uncontrollably.

Eric Wesley Wins 2016 Artisti per Frescobaldi Award

Visual representation of the news item Eric Wesley Wins 2016 Artisti per Frescobaldi Award link

Eric Wesley is the winner of the 2016 Artisti per Frescobaldi Award. The announcement took place at the award ceremony held at GAM, Milan’s Gallery of Modern Art in Villa Reale, Milan. Wesley won with his artwork Not Yet Titled, 2016, which was selected by the award panel composed of Massimiliano Gioni, Samuel Keller, and Gianfranco Maraniello. Photo © Manfredi Gioacchini

Renée Green at MoCA Cleveland and FRONT Triennial

Visual representation of the news item Renée Green at MoCA Cleveland and FRONT Triennial link

For FRONT 2022, Cleveland-born artist Renée Green has conceived Contact, her first major exhibition in the city, which occupies all of moCa Cleveland’s public spaces and radiates out into the city with workshops and film screenings.

A contrapuntal exhibition, Contact weaves together Green’s own works–some newly commissioned by FRONT 2022­–with a vast array of invited participants with whom she’s been in conversation through the years.

Marina Rheingantz: FRAC Auvergne Catalogue

Visual representation of the news item Marina Rheingantz: FRAC Auvergne Catalogue link

Marina Rheingantz’s paintings and embroidery are nourished by the recollection of Brazilian landscapes, memories of the compactness of the earth, of light and its variations, of the atmospheric nebula of twilight, of the pointillist dissemination of birds in the sky, of the emergence in clusters of flowers and shrubs, of mounds emerged on the surface of the flooded plains… Painting landscapes, today, cannot be envisaged without the awareness of the incongruity and the inactuality of such subject. Painting landscapes cannot depart from the conviction that such a subject – historically exhausted – can still be tackled, especially if one keeps in mind a banality that it is always good to remember, namely that a painting is first of all the story of a look at something: the painting tells how the painter’s gaze landed on his subject before placing it on its support. What we see of Marina Rheingantz’s landscapes are not the landscapes themselves but a singular look at these expanses, the way she sees them with memory, in the leafing of plans and patterns, the aerial dives of expanses without horizon strewn with suspended patterns, agglomerates of light, dust, phosphenes, clouds of microscopic ephemera, spangled with particles of reality frozen in appearance and yet always moving. The gaze is brought to a halt, stopped in its surveying by the resistance of the paint, by the compactness of its surface, by the web of patterns and signs that dot the areas and are superimposed on them like openwork filters.

Texts by Douglas Fogle and Jean-Charles Vergne
French / English, format 30 x 24 cm, 216 pages

Publisher: FRAC Auvergne

Daniel Buren at MoMA

Visual representation of the news item Daniel Buren at MoMA link

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, has opened a room on its fourth floor featuring 12 striped cotton fabric works by Daniel Buren

In 1965, Buren visited the Marché Saint-Pierre, a textile market in Paris, and purchased rolls of striped canvas reminiscent of awnings you might see outside a café. Taken by the stripes’ minimalism and neutrality, Buren began to use this canvas for his works, painting over the colored stripes at or near the left and right borders of the canvas in white acrylic. He felt that the simplicity of the stripes allows his works to relate to their physical surroundings—and in so doing, they call attention to the social and political dimensions of the contexts in which they’re displayed.

The works will remain on view at MoMA until autumn 2022.

Lesley Vance at Xavier Hufkens

Visual representation of the news item Lesley Vance at Xavier Hufkens link

Vance’s oeuvre has a temporal dimension, since the artist not only works within the pictorial space but also across time: she often elaborates her constellations of free-flowing lines and loops over the course of months. During this period, an initially active sequence of gestures develops into a matrix of interrelated shapes and, crucially, a vigorous interplay between light and shadow, foreground and background. Taking the conventional definition of ‘slipstream’ as ‘an assisting force that draws something along behind it’, Vance’s paintings can be said to follow in the slipstream of the streaks and striations left behind in the wake of her initial squeegeed gestures. This foundational and intuitive movement of paint produces marks of varying velocity that act as the catalyst for subsequent gestures and actions. Working without assistants, her compositions are intimately linked to the physical act of painting, and her large-format works bear witness to both the reach, and limits, of the human body. Added to this is the emphasis on colour that becomes – especially in the larger paintings – an almost kinetic force. Lesley Vance not only demonstrates an eye for evocative hues but also the way in which contrasting and complementary shades can evoke an atmosphere, idea or even an art historical reference. The artist’s considered use of bright contrasts, bold sweeping lines, simplified organic forms and areas of pure vibrant colour (red, blue, yellow, and green) lend her most recent works an intense visual dynamism.

Renée Green: Camino Road

Visual representation of the news item Renée Green: Camino Road link

First published in 1994, Camino Road is artist Renée Green’s debut novel—a short, ruminative work infused with semantic ambiguity and the dreamy poetry of the quotidian. Republished here in a facsimile edition, the book ostensibly traces its protagonist Lyn’s journeys to Mexico and her return to attend art school in 1980s New York, but what emerges is more an intertextual assemblage of the moments between drives, dreams, and consciousness. Lyn does her Spanish homework and makes note to read Anna Kavan and Cortázar; she watches Fellini; she dreams about the Mediterranean Sea. Much like Green’s multimedia installations encompassing the sonic, spatial, and visual, Camino Road is richly layered—part intellectual genealogy, part fictional personal memory, and part cultural criticism.

Green has described the book as a “self-conscious homage to or parody of the ‘road novel,’ ‘bohemia,’ and artist-rebels.” “I’d been thinking about the beat generation, figures like Jack Kerouac, Burroughs, etc.—the mythic construction of the artist personality as rebel and how females, and myself in particular, entered into that,” she said. “These ‘beat’ sources seemed to form a typical American introduction to the idea of bohemia and of being an artist.”

Originally created as part of Green’s contribution for the group exhibition “Cocido y crudo/The Cooked and the Raw” at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, the text is written in both English and Spanish, and accompanied by an appendix of photographs and ephemera tracing Madrid’s La Movida, a Spanish countercultural moment from the 1980s. The book was published through Green’s production company, Free Agent Media (FAM), which since 1994 has been circulating and exhibiting media, printed matter, and time-based projects.

A unique treatise on the circuits of exchange in gender, politics, and art, Camino Road can also be read as a variation on the classic Bildungsroman genre. “I don’t feel developed in any area,” thinks Lyn at one point. “It’s very difficult being young and incomplete.” Importantly, she also muses, “I want to be swallowed by another language.”

In Conversation: Piero Golia and Pier Paolo Pancotto

Visual representation of the news item In Conversation: Piero Golia and Pier Paolo Pancotto link

Piero Golia will speak with curator Pier Paolo Pancotto in conjunction with the publication of a new book about the artist’s recent work at La Fondazione, Rome. On January 18, 2020, a team of construction workers with jackhammers appeared at the institution and rather than conducting maintenance work, as might be expected, were directed by Golia to engrave the phrase “The End” into the floor as the third and final performance of his Roman Trilogy. Over the course of the work’s production, the unrelenting drilling disrupted the surrounding commercial gallery spaces—both literally and conceptually—causing the paintings hanging on the walls to shake uncontrollably.

Eric Wesley Wins 2016 Artisti per Frescobaldi Award

Visual representation of the news item Eric Wesley Wins 2016 Artisti per Frescobaldi Award link

Eric Wesley is the winner of the 2016 Artisti per Frescobaldi Award. The announcement took place at the award ceremony held at GAM, Milan’s Gallery of Modern Art in Villa Reale, Milan. Wesley won with his artwork Not Yet Titled, 2016, which was selected by the award panel composed of Massimiliano Gioni, Samuel Keller, and Gianfranco Maraniello. Photo © Manfredi Gioacchini